starlite0816:

keyofcminor:

So we have these at the union and I’m really happy about this.

My school is a good place.

starlite0816:

keyofcminor:

So we have these at the union and I’m really happy about this.

My school is a good place.

arielsfunblr:

This is the type of joke that appeals specifically to me and maybe a handful of other people.

  • Max: Mountain Dew is one of those things that I always think I want then I start drinking it and I'm like ewww
  • Me: Suddenly a wild Nate Smith gets an unexplained pain in his chest. He wipes face to find a single tear.

Rosenhan’s study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or “pseudopatients” (three women and five men) who briefly simulated auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had not experienced any more hallucinations. Hospital staff failed to detect a single pseudopatient, and instead believed that all of the pseudopatients exhibited symptoms of ongoing mental illness. Several were confined for months. All were forced to admit to having a mental illness and agree to take antipsychotic drugs as a condition of their release. The second part involved an offended hospital challenging Rosenhan to send pseudopatients to its facility, whom its staff would then detect. Rosenhan agreed and in the following weeks out of 193 new patients the staff identified 41 as potential pseudopatients, with 19 of these receiving suspicion from at least 1 psychiatrist and 1 other staff member. In fact Rosenhan had sent no-one to the hospital.